A Farewell to Pork... and Beef… and Chicken…

 

The last time was a pork sandwich, with greens, from the local pizza shop. The sandwich arrived soggy with grease; the pork, a glum gray; the broccoli rabe limp and lifeless. It was, for all intents, a waste of my 10 bucks. That was a Friday. April 8. I’d come home from work feeling tired, hungry and very out of shape. My girlfriend was having drinks with some friends, so I collapsed on the couch, flipped on Netflix, picked up the phone … and ordered the sandwich.

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From The Editor: Water Works

It’s thrilling to see the Philadelphia Water Department taking aggressive, progressive action to solve the city’s stormwater woes. Faced with a system in crisis, they came up with “Green City, Clean Waters,” a solution that favors rain barrels, grassy sidewalks and tree pits over the construction of yet another massive tunnel. “The hardest thing to do is to reverse the trend of creating a concrete barrier to nature,” says Joanne Dahme, the Water Department’s general manager of public affairs. This is a triumph of good design.
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Local Ties

 


"Everybody eats!” is a rallying cry of food and environmental activists
eager to grow a broad-based movement. With the exception of the Philly Naked Bike Ride, everybody wears clothes, too. Can our daily routine of tucking in and buttoning up lead us to a sustainable future?

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Slice of Heaven

This month’s cover story on Greensgrow Farm hits on a number of our favorite issues—cultivating community, repurposing vacant land, food and self-reliance—but, at its core, it’s about the joys of hard work. As my dad used to say, “Hard work ain’t easy.” He would know. With the help of my mom and their four children, my dad has anchored a family business for the past 33 years. The place is called Sizzle Pi, a pizza and hoagie restaurant in Wilkes-Barre, PA.
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Electric Avenues

I can’t wait to get my next electricity bill. By following low-tech energy guru Nick Pine’s simple advice—monitoring the difference between indoor and outdoor temperatures—I’m certain that I’ve already reduced my A/C usage significantly. (Another tool in the battle to conserve: a rock-solid American-made fan from the 1950s that shows no signs of slowing down, though I should probably wear a weightlifting belt when I move it.)
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From the Editor: A Hybrid Movement

I’m very jealous of the west philly hybrid x team. In middle school, I took a home ec class for one quarter. My crowning achievement? A loaf of banana bread. In wood shop, I sawed and sanded a less-than-perfect corner shelf—it was promptly lost somewhere in my parents’ attic. Then in high school, nothing. Not a single practical class that would help me when I get hungry, or my apartment needs a repair, or my clothes need mending.
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From the Editor: Home Made

Alex passed his Publisher’s Notes duties along to me this month because I am, simply put, obsessed with food. I’ve been looking forward to this issue for months.

Last June, I moved back to Philadelphia—my hometown—after a few years in the wilderness (read: Nashville, TN).
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From the Editor: Year One

Year One

It’s time to celebrate, Grid is turning one! In honor of this occasion, we’re throwing a party at Yards Brewing Company on Saturday, April 10 from 5 to 8 p.m. (see inside back cover for details). We would love if you stopped by, had a beer and said hello.

I suppose this is a time for reflection, something I’ve had little time to do since this magazine’s inception. “Lurker” is a term used to describe a person who reads a message board but never contributes. And, for years, that’s more or less what I was in the sustainability community.

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From the Editor: Philly to Farm

"There are so many opportunities. We wish we were 20 years younger,” Paul Crivellaro mused, sitting across the kitchen table from his wife Ember in their Berks County home. It was a cold, gray December day and the Crivellaros had invited me in for coffee and cookies after a short meet-and-greet with their herd of heritage pigs—hulking beasts with floppy ears and low-key personalities. Trotting amongst the massive backs and inquisitive snouts were troupes of piglets, barely the size of my rotund housecat. 

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From the Editor: A Hands-On Holiday

When I was a kid, the holiday season was all about the gifts. I remember them well: baseball gloves, bikes, electronic games. As the publisher of Grid, I wish I could tell you that all of that stuff didn’t make me happy—but that would be a big fat lie. Each year, my favorite gift and I were inseparable; it was hard to tell where one ended and the other began. And the sweet anticipation the night before! My siblings and I were caught in a negative loop, so eager for the next day to arrive that we couldn’t sleep, thus prolonging our waking agony.
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From the Editor: Rock On

Regardless of how this World Series turns out, watching the Phillies, and the city’s transformation, has been magical. Bitter and pessimistic fans have become believers; the team itself is fearless. Anyone who doubts that people can change—or that mindsets can shift—should look no further than our beloved Fightin’ Phils.The quest for sustainability isn’t quite as concrete as the quest for greatness in sports.
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From the Editor: Food, For Thought

When I was a freshman in high school, two soda machines were installed in our cafeteria. School lunches cost a dollar, but the truly rebellious kids bypassed the lunch lines entirely and would buy a soda for 50 cents and two 25 cent bags of chips. Katie Cavuto-Boyle (p.37) would not have approved! One day, however, I couldn’t resist the forbidden fruit (fructose?), and, after leaving the brown bag lunch mom had packed at home, ate the soda/chips combination. Hours later, I felt awful, and in one of those rare moments of teenage self-awareness, I vowed to never do that again.
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From the Editor: Try It!

It’s August and the full splendor of the CSA is upon us. For the uninitiated, CSA stands for Community Supported Agriculture. (This acronym is somewhat obtuse. I would suggest replacing it with BFF, Buying From a Farmer.) The way it works is you sign up before the farmers’ harvest, usually in the late winter or early spring, and then you receive a weekly subscription to their fresh fruits and vegetables that you pick up at a location in your neighborhood.
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