Book Review: Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money

Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money
by Woody Tasch
Chelsea Green Publishing; $21.95

Our world economy revolves around capitalism and is in a state of constant expansion. Having doubled two times since 1960, it is expected to quadruple again by the middle of this century. Many fear a collision between profit and growth and the welfare of humanity and the environment. It would be easy to just throw in the towel and prepare for the worst. Woody Tasch, however, isn’t overwhelmed by modern capitalism’s power. The venture capitalist and president of the new non-government organization (NGO) Slow Money, offers a comprehensive solution to current and impending crises in his new book, Inquiries Into the Nature of Slow Money.

Why “slow money”? Tasch was inspired in part by Slow Food, an international nonprofit organization that links the pleasure of food with commitment to community and the environment. His concept of slow money focuses on bringing money back down to earth. Profit and growth may be the core motivators of today’s economy, but Tasch envisions a non-destructive economy “built around principles of carrying capacity, care of the commons, sense of place and non-violence.” He believes that in order to heal the global disease, we must invest in sustainable enterprise and local community. In Tasch’s world, value and taste (homegrown broccoli) take precedence over price and expedience (supermarket broccoli). —Grace Antonini